5 Things to Avoid When Monetizing Your Artwork

Thinking about these 5 things early on in your artrepreneurial journey will help you avoid time-wasting mistakes.

1. Undervaluing Yourself

As you start to think about asking for money for your artwork, it can be hard to place a dollar amount on your value. But doing so is one of the first steps to monetizing your artwork. It’s important to strategically price your artwork–learn about how to do so here.

If you’ve never charged for your art before, it can be easy to undervalue yourself. You might sell your first oil painting for $300 and realize later that it was worth at least $1,000. A mentor once told me to start high to test the market; if people won’t buy my product because it’s too expensive, then lower my price. Do this until they finally purchase, and you’ve found your sweet spot. Unfortunately, lots of artrepreneurs (myself included) do the opposite. We price too low and gradually increase as we realize the value that we’re really providing. Save yourself some time and lost money, and make sure you are valuing yourself and your artwork fairly.

2. Undervaluing Others

Artrepreneurs are often “solo-preneurs”–people who are building a business on their own. As a solopreneur, its easy to undervalue the help and support of others. You might think that it’s easier to do things on your own, but have you tried working with someone else to accomplish the same goals? Of course, working with others isn’t always easy, but the power of teamwork makes the collaboration worth it. Instead of trying to do things all on your own, start off your artrepreneurial journey with others on your side.

3. Not Thinking About the Customer First

Being an artrepreneur is unique because artwork is often more important to artrepreneurs than other products like, let’s say, toilet paper or toothbrushes. Artrepreneurs are so connected to their artwork, that they often forgot to think about their customers first. Remember: As an artrepreneur, you are creating for other people, not for yourself. The customer must be the core of your creative business. Your art-based product or service is made for them.

4. Only Creating for Money

However, artists also need creative time that is not restricted by product limitations or the wants of the customer. As an artrepreneur, remember to take time to create for yourself, not only for your customers. Become dedicated to working on art for your business AND art for yourself. If you forget to create for the sake of creating, you risk losing the joy of creating artwork for others by burning yourself out.

5. Not Asking for Feedback

Depending on the creative product or service you offer, you may have a close interaction with your customers or you may not. Regardless, you must find a way to ask for their feedback. Understanding the experience of your customers will:

– Help you ensure that your product or service is of quality
– Help you improve the customer experience in the future
– Help you identify important changes that you might need to make to your business model
– Help you develop trust with your customers

Whether you create a standardized digital survey, informally ask your customers about their experience in person, or do something in between, getting feedback from your customers and your partners can mean the difference between building a sustainable creative business and not. Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback from others; its purpose is to make you more successful in the future.


Thinking about these 5 things early on in your artrepreneurial journey will help you avoid time-wasting mistakes. But also remember to revisit each of these points as you grow your creative business. All are important to your continued artrepreneurial success!

Peace, Kayla

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Is art entrepreneurship?

You’ve probably heard the popular advice that “Art doesn’t pay the bills.” But what if it could?

You’ve probably heard the popular advice that “Art doesn’t pay the bills.” But what if it could? Turns out, there’s a new term flying around: ‘artrepreneurship’. It’s all about making money with your art, by building a brand and coming up with creative ways to monetize your work. In a world where content is more and more important, your creative skills are more and more in demand!

So… YES! Art can be entrepreneurship–it all depends on how you approach it. Before turning your creative vision into a business startup, there are a few things you need to think about:

Do you really want to turn your art into a business?

Being an entrepreneur is a full-time job with lots of overtime. You should ask yourself whether or not you want to make sharing your art a full-time commitment. Many artists want to take their creative endeavors full-time, but fail to realize that much of their entrepreneurial journey will be all business. In addition to working on your art, you’ll need to deal with marketing, business strategy, networking, and all kinds of other business-related activities. Are you interested in business, or would you rather work on your art in other ways? Many amazing companies need artists on their teams and many artists prefer to keep their creative endeavors as a soul-freeing hobby. What is right for you?

What’s your long-term vision?

So you’re pretty sure that you want to take your creative work and build a full-on brand and company. But what does the future of this business look like? There are two kinds of businesses out there: a lifestyle company and a growth company. A lifestyle company is one that can support you with monthly income and provide an opportunity to work on your art as a full-time job. Lifestyle companies are usually small businesses. A growth company, on the other hand, is one that has the potential to grow without you and become a global brand. This kind of company often requires products that have the potential to sell at massive quantities.

Deciding which of these you envision for the future is crucial to understanding how you will devise your business strategy and how you will build your brand. Don’t worry, we’ll talk about how to build your business in accordance with your long-term vision in upcoming posts!

Are you ready to embark on your entrepreneurial journey?

Okay, you’ve decided that you are ready to build your creative brand and pursue the entrepreneurial journey. Here are some thing you should consider before taking the leap: 1) Are you in a position to dedicate time every day or every week to building your brand and business? 2) Are you ready to learn all kinds of new skills that you may have never been interested in before (building a website, marketing campaigns, branding your message)? and 3) Are you ready to share your message with the world?

If your answer is to yes each of these 3 questions, it’s time to combine your art with entrepreneurship in order to manifest your vision and share your creativity! In this blog, we’re going talk all about how to develop your brand, your marketing messages, your business model, and more. Stay up-to-date by clicking the follow button below!

PS: Don’t be afraid to share this knowledge with other artists you know. The more our creative communities learn about how business can be used to share their messages, the more opportunity we all have to thrive in this growing ‘Artrepreneurship’ market!

Peace, Kayla