The Artrepreneur’s Battle with Ego

This is a blog about artrepreneurship–so why are we talking about ego?

Beowulf’s inability to control his ego and let go of his pride ultimately resulted in his death and the vulnerability of his people.
Lucifer’s hubris and selfish viewpoints disconnected him from his heavenly people and caused suffering for the world below.
King Oedipus’ prideful attempts to deny the prophecies of the Greek gods brought about the death of those he loved.

Our (real and imagined) relations with the phenomenon known as the “ego” are nothing new. For centuries, we’ve been intrigued by ego and its impacts, most likely because it affects each of us. Our fascination with ego is not unprecedented–when not monitored and dealt with strategically, our egos can cause problems for us that we never intended.

artrepreneurship, ego, successful entrepreneur
Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

That’s why it’s important for us to talk about ego here at Artrepreneurship – where ‘art’ and ‘entrepreneurship’ meet. As an artrepreneur, you will be faced with many challenges related to your ego. After all, this is YOUR creative business, this is YOUR vision, and much of your success lies on YOUR decisions and actions. It’s hard not to overemphasize the importance of yourself.

However, there are some ways you can keep your ego in check during your artrepreneurial journey:

Listening to others
As an artrepreneur, its important to ask others for their thoughts and opinions. We’ve talked before about the importance of others along your artrepreneurial journey: involving others can help you strengthen your weaknesses, come up with new ideas, and see things from different perspectives. Take the time to listen to what others have to say. You might find a gem in their advice one day.

Asking others for advice (and sometimes, taking it)
This is similar to listening to others, but requires that you take the first step in initiating their involvement. When you do ask for advice from others, listen deeply and consider what they have to say. Remember: you don’t always have to follow their advice. But, if there seems to be potential in what they have to say, don’t be afraid to take their advice and give them credit for the benefit they’ve added to your creative company.

Trusting the ability of others
Sometimes, we’ve added people to our team but still don’t fully trust their ability to execute. It’s easier to trust and rely on ourselves, because we’re confident that we won’t let ourselves down. But sometimes, you have to give others a chance to prove their ability and add to your vision. If they let you down, you can re-evaluate their position with your business–but at least give them a fair, fighting chance.

Evaluating yourself realistically
We’ve talked many times about the importance of being able to evaluate yourself and your circumstances from a place of reality. Sometimes, our ego can cause us to overestimate our own abilities or underestimate the abilities of others. This can leave promises unfulfilled and opportunities undiscovered. Work with your ego by evaluating yourself realistically and acting accordingly.

When you don’t take the time to check your ego as an artrepreneur, you might face unnecessary problems, such as:

– Losing potential partners
– Losing potential clients
– Missing out on good opportunities
– De-valuing your brand

Dealing with your ego might not be the first thing you think of when planning for your artrepreneurial journey, but it’s important. Keeping your ego in check will help you build a successful creative business that will last.

Peace, Kayla

Follow Artrepreneurship – where ‘art’ and ‘entrepreneurship’ meet to receive more straight-up information that will make your artrepreneurial journey easier.